Tech Farm’s Caroline Franklin entertains through emails

By Sara Howell-Floyd

“Unable to shop at the Tech Farm Salesroom because our hours are an inconvenience to you, do not fret, because we just extended them. This is probably the most exciting thing to happen at Louisiana Tech since the Aspire Tower was put up in front of the College of Business.”

From hours of operation to $1 ice cream cones to 17-year-old cows making their way from Tech Farm to the Tech Farm Salesroom, these are just a few of the entertaining topics of the Tech Farm Salesroom emails that are sent out to the students and faculty at Louisiana Tech. 

Caroline Franklin, a junior secondary education major who aspires to teach social studies, is the mastermind behind these email that are sent out to the Tech community. 

“I know it surprises people when I say I am in education and not an ag science major,” Franklin said. “My sister used to work at South Campus and when she graduated, I came here, she knew people and was able to get me this job.”

Franklin said that she does not have much of process when it comes to these emails. It is simply her boss telling her what she needs to write about, and she sits down at her laptop and begins typing. 

“Mostly I write the emails myself, but sometimes I get ideas from other people,” Franklin said. “I do send the emails to my best friend first, though before I send the email to make sure that they will make sense, especially when I am talking about the technical stuff.” 

The goal of these emails is not to just sell products from the salesroom, but Franklin also likes to make people laugh. 

“I get probably 10 to 15 replies on most of the emails I send,” Franklin said. “Most people are nice and say things like ‘this is the best email ever’ or ‘I share these with my family, and we all get a laugh.’ I am just glad that I can make people laugh.”

Students around campus are not shy about sharing the joy these emails bring them. Emily Rettig, a senior at Tech, shares that they brighten her day.

“When they’re in all caps or about the 17-year-old cow, I can usually rely on getting a chuckle out of the emails,” Rettig said. “I also like that they provide updates about what they have in stock as I like to support local places when I can.” 

One of the favorite emails amongst the students on campus would be the one about the 17-year-old cow, not only did Rettig express how much she liked it but so did Tara Spridco, a junior at Tech. 

“I really like the email about the cow,” Spridco said. “When I read that email, I just could not stop laughing, it was great.” 

This is just a little bit of the email for those who do not get the emails or may have let this one slide past them in their inbox: “At the salesroom, we have an angus beef that walked Tech Farm for 17 amazing years, but now calls the Tech Farm Salesroom freezer home. To clarify, the cow was 17 years old, we have NOT had steaks just chilling around for the last 17 years, that would not exactly be very good.”

As of right now there are no emails in the works that she could share but you never know when a cow will be for sale, or when there will be $1 ice cream cones as the weather gets warmer and classes begin to wrap up.

“You never know when I may appear in your inbox,” Franklin said. 


Lessons from the diamond

By Doug Strickel

Growing up back in the 1970s and ’80s, I played the about every sport offered at some point and learned a great deal from each one.  Looking back, I think those learnings from the athletic fields and courts were as valuable to me as the classroom education.  I make that comment not to lower the value of that classroom education, but rather to elevate the importance of what can be learned in athletic competition.

While all those sports played had a role in my development, baseball is probably the most representative of real life.  Baseball exemplifies life in so many ways.

In life:

  • We are going to fail at times (strike out) and that can be very disappointing.
  • We are going to find success at times (a base hit) and that can be so good,
  • We are going to make mistakes (errors), but we must learn from it, put it behind us and get ready for the next challenge.
  • We may do some really impressive things (great catch in the field), and we need to celebrate and cherish those experiences.
  • We are going to experience others letting us down (left on base without scoring), but we have to understand, forgive, and/or just move forward.
  • We are sometimes just going to have bad days (give up three home runs in one inning – Yes, I did that), but there will be better days too.
  • Things aren’t always fair (bad call by umpire), but life must go on.
  • We are going to see others have success at times while we struggle (hitting line drives right at people and no matter how hard we try we can’t get on base), but life goes on.
  • We are going to see others that we are close to struggle (teammate in a slump), and we do all we can to encourage and help them.

Through all those failures, successes, mistakes, letdowns, bad days, great days, unfair situations and struggles, the key is to just keep playing the game.  In baseball, one team wins, and one team loses based on the results on the scoreboard.  The only “loser” in life is the one that quits competing, quits playing the game, or quits trying.  Failure is not losing.  If we aren’t failing at times, we are likely not challenging ourselves enough! Those that play it safe will never reach their potential.

Whatever season of life you are going through right now, consider what getting back in the game means to you. Sometimes getting back in the game starts with just being a good teammate toward others.  Maybe it’s a big step forward in faith out of your comfort zone.  It could just be battling through a tough time with the support of a few close teammates.  

Just like baseball, life can be hard, unfair and disappointing.  It can also be fun, impactful and rewarding.  The key is to just keep playing the game!

 


The colonel’s speech 

Shortly after 8:00 p.m. on October 14, 1912, the Colonel walked through a crowd of well-wishers at the Gilpatrick Hotel in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and stepped into the back seat of an open-topped car.  He was expected to arrive within minutes at the Milwaukee Auditorium, four blocks away, to deliver a speech.  Still standing, he waved to the crowd.  One of his two secretaries, Albert H. Martin, stood with him.  A man later identified as John Flammang Schrank pushed his way through the crowd, pulled a .38 caliber pistol, and fired from a distance of about 7 feet.  The Colonel barely moved.  He showed no sign of panic or pain.  At almost the same instant that Schrank fired the shot, Albert jumped from the back seat and Captain A.O. Girard, another member of the Colonel’s party, jumped from the front seat onto the man with the pistol.  They quickly overpowered Schrank and disarmed him.  The Colonel told the men to bring the shooter closer so he could get a good look at him.  The colonel gazed into the shooters face and said, “the poor creature.”

The crowd turned hostile toward the would-be assassin.  “Lynch him!” they cried, “Kill him!”  “Stop, stop!” the Colonel yelled.  “Stand back; don’t hurt him!”  Only at the insistence of the Colonel did the crowd refrain from tearing the man apart and allow escorts to take Schrank inside the hotel to await the arrival of police.  Multiple people asked, “Are you hurt, Colonel?”  The Colonel responded with a smile, “Oh, no.  Missed me that time.  I’m not hurt a bit.” He turned to the remaining members of his party and said, “I think we’d better be going or we will be late.”

They had hardly driven one block when John McGrath, the Colonel’s other secretary, exclaimed, “Look, Colonel.  There is a hole in your overcoat.”  The Colonel looked at the hole, unbuttoned the coat and felt of his chest.  When he removed his hand, his fingers were stained with blood.  Speaking to no one in particular, the Colonel said, “It looks as though I had been hit, but I don’t think it is anything serious.”

When they reached the auditorium, the Colonel went into a dressing room.  Several physicians made a superficial examination of the wound and suggested that the Colonel leave for the hospital immediately.  The Colonel calmly responded “I will deliver this speech or die, one or the other.”  The physicians’ protested, but the Colonel walked out of the dressing room and onto the stage.  The crowd cheered loudly as the Colonel took his seat and waited for the program to begin.   

Henry F. Cochems, a Wisconsin political leader, stepped to the front of the platform and held up his hand.  The crowd sensed something was wrong and immediately fell silent.  “I have something to tell you,” he said with a trembling voice, “and I hope you will received the news with calmness.”  The crowd was deathly silent.  “Colonel Roosevelt has been shot.  He is wounded.”  At this, Mr. Cochems turned and looked at the Colonel.  

The crowd’s reaction was anything but calm.  People yelled and screamed out of shock.  Some of the patrons rushed toward the platform to get a better look at the Colonel.  The Colonel stood and calmly walked to the edge of the platform.  “It’s true,” the Colonel told the crowd as he unbuttoned his coat and showed them the blood-stained shirt.  “I’m going to ask you to be very quiet,” he said, “and please excuse me for making you a very long speech.  I’ll do the best I can, but you see there’s a bullet in my body.  But it’s nothing.  I’m not hurt badly.”  The Colonel’s words were met with an outburst of cheering.

The Colonel pulled out his 50-page speech and began his oration.  The crowd listened intently to every word the Colonel said.  His speech was somewhat quieter than normal and his gestures were more subdued.  He spoke for a while and suddenly his voice sank.  He seemed to stagger.  One of the doctors and another in the Colonel’s party approached him and quietly insisted that he leave immediately for a hospital.  The Colonel seemed to regain all of his strength and told them, “I’m going to finish this speech.  I’m all right; let me alone.”  The Colonel struggled at times as he spoke for well over an hour.  At the conclusion of the Colonel’s speech, he looked briefly at the cheering crowd and calmly walked off the platform and into a waiting car.

The Colonel’s driver sped through the streets of Milwaukee to the hospital where a team of doctors were waiting.  They whisked him to an operating room and quickly removed his clothing.  He insisted that he was not hurt badly and told the doctors that they were taking it too seriously.  The doctors continued their work.  The entrance wound was easy enough to find, but they were unable to determine the location of the bullet.  While they waited for a staff member to retrieve an x-ray machine, the Colonel sat up on the operating table and entertained the doctors with political stories and jokes.          

By using x-rays and probes, the doctors learned that the bullet had lodged in the Colonel’s chest muscle.  It struck no major arteries or organs.  The doctors concluded that it would be riskier to remove the bullet than to leave it in place.  They were curious to learn, however, what had kept the .38 caliber bullet from penetrating deeper into the Colonel’s chest.  As they examined his clothing the answer became clear.  The bullet had passed through the Colonel’s thick overcoat, through his 50-page speech which he had folded in half so that it would fit into his pocket which made it 100 pages thick, through both sides of his metal eyeglasses case, through his waistcoat, shirt and undershirt, and finally, into his chest.  Had the Colonel written a shorter speech, had he not doubled the speech over and placed in his chest pocket, had he placed his eyeglasses case in another pocket, the Colonel could have been the first former president of the United States to be assassinated.  The Colonel’s speech was part of his campaign for a third non-consecutive term as president, which he ultimately lost.  The Colonel was… Theodore Roosevelt.

Sources:

1.  The Baltimore Sun, October 15, 1912, p.1.

Remembering Terry Burns

Terry Young Burns, age 69, of Ruston, La., died at his home on Monday, April 25, 2022, following a hard-fought battle with cancer.  Terry loved the word of God and and the lives of people.  

Visitation and funeral service will be held Friday at The Bridge Community Church, 2301 North Trenton, Ruston, La. Visitation will begin at 10:00 am with funeral service to follow at 11:30 am. Burial service will be at the Bernice Cemetery in Bernice, Louisiana.  

He is preceded in death by his father, Edward Young Burns and his mother, Demaris Rockett  Burns of Bernice, La. He is survived by his loving  wife of 48 years, Jeanne Goss Burns of Ruston, La.,  daughter Brittany Burns Griep (Ryan) of Ruston,La. and son, Paul Young Burns (Ashley) of Memphis, Tennessee.  Terry and Jeanne, affectionately known as Poppa T and Gigi, have five grandchildren, Madalyn Claire Griep, David Lehnen Griep, Kinsley Claire Griep, Jessie Elizabeth Burns (Jessie B), and Abigail Noel Burns.  Terry is survived by two sisters, Janie Lou Burns Colvin (Bill), Brentwood, Tennessee, and Rebecca Burns Barnett, Nashville, Tennessee. He is also survived by his sister-in-law, Mary Ann Goss, Irving, Texas, sister-in law Debbie Vlahakos (Vic), Houston, Tx, and a host of sweet nieces and nephews.  

Terry worked in the banking industry for a total of 45 years and recently retired in December 2021 as Vice President, Lending and Compliance, from Century Next Bank in Ruston, La.  

Terry grew up in Bernice, La, and graduated from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge in 1975. Terry and Jeanne have made their home and raised their children in the Dubach and Ruston area for the past thirty- nine years.  

Terry was a member of The Bridge Community Church and served the Lord and his church family faithfully.  He was a quiet man of great integrity. Jeanne, his wife, was the love of his life and they have built a life together based upon the principles taught from the word of God and sought to work hard and love others well. He was a wonderful father to Brittany and Paul. Terry loved and was a loyal fan of LSU Tiger football and baseball.  He enjoyed reading, dancing recitals for Maddy and Kinsley, watching  his grandson, David, play baseball, and going to the Memphis Zoo with Jessie B and Abigail. His grandchildren were the delights of his life.  

Terry will be missed greatly by his family and friends.  “I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith. Now there is in store for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, will award to me on that day- and not only to me, but also to all who have longed for His appearing. (2 Timothy 4:7-8) 

Pallbearers serving will be Dr. John Broocks, Dr. Jeb Butler, Dr Lynn Browning, Reverend Ronnie Dyes, Gary Holdman, James Ramsaur, Jered Ramsey.  

The family would like to thank Dr. Ben Grigsby and staff at Northwood Medical, Ruston, La;  Dr. Milind Javle, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas; Compassus Hospice, and Tender Touch Service for their care for Terry.  


Notice of death — April 27, 2022

Gladys Joye Fellows 
December 18, 1938 – April 25, 2022 
Visitation: 12:45-2 p.m. Friday, April 29 at Mt. Ararat Baptist Church, 792 LA-552, Downsville
Funeral service: 2 p.m. Friday, April 29 at Mt. Ararat Baptist Church, 792 LA-552, Downsville 
Cemetery committal: Friday, April 29 at Mt. Ararat Cemetery, Hwy 552, Downsville  

Sidney Joel Colvin Sr. 
May 8, 1961 – April 25, 2022 
Service: Kilpatrick Funeral Homes – Ruston, Thursday, April 28, 2022, 10:00 am 
Cemetery: Greenwood Cemetery, Thursday, April 28, 2022  

Mona Cayer 
March 24, 1937 – April 26, 2022 
Arrangements pending 

Wayne Knox 
July 14, 1944 – April 26, 2022 
Arrangements pending 


Remembering Terry Burns

Terry Young Burns, age 69, of Ruston, La., died at his home on Monday, April 25, 2022, following a hard-fought battle with cancer.  Terry loved the word of God and and the lives of people. 

Visitation and funeral service will be held Friday at The Bridge Community Church, 2301 North Trenton, Ruston, La. Visitation will begin at 10:00 am with funeral service to follow at 11:30 am. Burial service will be at the Bernice Cemetery in Bernice, Louisiana. 

He is preceded in death by his father, Edward Young Burns and his mother, Demaris Rockett  Burns of Bernice, La. He is survived by his loving  wife of 48 years, Jeanne Goss Burns of Ruston, La.,  daughter Brittany Burns Griep (Ryan) of Ruston,La. and son, Paul Young Burns (Ashley) of Memphis, Tennessee.  Terry and Jeanne, affectionately known as Poppa T and Gigi, have five grandchildren, Madalyn Claire Griep, David Lehnen Griep, Kinsley Claire Griep, Jessie Elizabeth Burns (Jessie B), and Abigail Noel Burns.  Terry is survived by two sisters, Janie Lou Burns Colvin (Bill), Brentwood, Tennessee, and Rebecca Burns Barnett, Nashville, Tennessee. He is also survived by his sister-in-law, Mary Ann Goss, Irving, Texas, sister-in law Debbie Vlahakos (Vic), Houston, Tx, and a host of sweet nieces and nephews. 

Terry worked in the banking industry for a total of 45 years and recently retired in December 2021 as Vice President, Lending and Compliance, from Century Next Bank in Ruston, La. 

Terry grew up in Bernice, La, and graduated from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge in 1975. Terry and Jeanne have made their home and raised their children in the Dubach and Ruston area for the past thirty- nine years. 

Terry was a member of The Bridge Community Church and served the Lord and his church family faithfully.  He was a quiet man of great integrity. Jeanne, his wife, was the love of his life and they have built a life together based upon the principles taught from the word of God and sought to work hard and love others well. He was a wonderful father to Brittany and Paul. Terry loved and was a loyal fan of LSU Tiger football and baseball.  He enjoyed reading, dancing recitals for Maddy and Kinsley, watching  his grandson, David, play baseball, and going to the Memphis Zoo with Jessie B and Abigail. His grandchildren were the delights of his life. 

Terry will be missed greatly by his family and friends.  “I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith. Now there is in store for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, will award to me on that day- and not only to me, but also to all who have longed for His appearing. (2 Timothy 4:7-8)

Pallbearers serving will be Dr. John Broocks, Dr. Jeb Butler, Dr Lynn Browning, Reverend Ronnie Dyes, Gary Holdman, James Ramsaur, Jered Ramsey. 

The family would like to thank Dr. Ben Grigsby and staff at Northwood Medical, Ruston, La;  Dr. Milind Javle, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas; Compassus Hospice, and Tender Touch Service for their care for Terry. 

 


Business grads achieve 97 percent overall placement rate

Students graduating from Louisiana Tech University’s College of Business during the 2020-21 academic year achieved a record 97 percent overall placement rate within six months post-grad.

Data collected by the College’s Office of Student Services includes undergraduate, Master of Business Administration (MBA), and Master of Accountancy (MAcc) students who earned degrees for the Fall 2020, Winter 2020-21, Spring 2021, and Summer 2021 quarters.

“The fantastic placements of our recent graduates are a strong indicator that our market-responsive curriculum is preparing innovative and ethical leaders for success in today’s rapidly changing business environment,” said Dr. Chris Martin, Dean of the College of Business. “Additionally, we offer numerous opportunities for students to hone their career readiness skills through workshops, networking sessions, and employer receptions.”

Specific placement rates six months post-graduation are as follows:

  • Undergraduate: 96 percent
  • MBA: 100 percent
  • MAcc: 100 percent

Many students secured jobs or admission to graduate school prior to graduation, including 100 percent of MAcc students, 81 percent of MBA students, and 64 percent of undergraduates. Students in the College were hired by 178 unique employers across the U.S. including Amazon, Graphic Packaging International, the FDIC, Enterprise Products Partners, IBM, Lumen Technologies, Origin Bank, KPMG, RoyOMartin, and Salesforce.

“Our alumni and employer partners play a critical role in helping our students obtain jobs,” said Jessica George, Executive Director of Student Services and Placement in the College of Business. “I’m grateful for their support of our career readiness efforts—from mentorships and facilitating connections to speaking at our events and reviewing resumes. Our alumni and friends open doors that impact our students’ success each day.”

The College hosts annual events focused on career preparation including Career and Student Success Week, Speed Interviewing Workshop, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in the Workplace Forum, and two Employer Receptions. Additionally, each College of Business student is required to take BUSN 320, a career preparation seminar course that supports all aspects of professional development.

“Inside and outside of the classroom, we work to ensure our students graduate with the skills needed to be successful business leaders,” said Martin. “We accomplish this through innovative academics and co-curricular programing that complements what is being taught in the classroom. These programs focus on our core themes of technology, innovation, and entrepreneurship, and provide a platform for high-level executives to share their insight and career advice with students. We look forward to having these new grads come back as they grow in their own careers and speak to future students.”

The College’s placement rate is calculated using the number of students who are employed, continuing their education, serving in the military or public service, or not seeking employment within of six months of graduation. Students seeking employment outside of the U.S. are removed from the data. The 2020-21 placement rate is based on the known career outcomes of 251 undergraduates, 17 MAcc students, and 108 MBA students.

For more information on student success and placement in the College of Business, visit business.latech.edu/student-success.


Creek’s Rugg earns Eagle Scout Court of Honor

By T. Scott Boatrght 

It’s become an annual tradition for Ruston Boy Scout Troop 45 in recent years — holding an Eagle Scout Court of Honor.

And Troop 45, chartered by Trinity United Methodist Church in Ruston,  was back at it recently as Cedar Creek senior Ethan Rugg was officially conferred with the highest rank in Scouting.

According to the BSA website, in Scouting the eagle stands for strength of character, and for knowledge of all phases of Scouting. The eagle represents an understanding of community and nation, and a deep respect for the same. The eagle is a symbol of what a young man has done as well as what that young man will do, and will be, when he grows to manhood. The eagle is a leader. The eagle is respected, both by his peers and by his adult leaders.

Since its inception in 1911, only four percent of Scouts have earned this rank after a lengthy review process.

In 2019, 8 percent of all Scouts BSA earned the Eagle Scout rank.

Involved in scouting since becoming a Cub Scout in the first grade, Rugg capped off his scouting days recently by completing the final stage to reach Eagle rank by planning, organizing and completing a service project whereby he and his crew constructed a wheelchair ramp for The Springs Church in Ruston.

Rugg is the son of Tracie and Jared Rugg, and, after graduation plans to attend Louisiana Tech University.

 
 

Ongoing dispute leads to man’s second arrest

A Ruston man has been arrested for the second time in five days in an ongoing dispute with his neighbors.

Steven Mark Schmitt, 59, of Ruston was arrested for violation of a protective order (supplemental order of bail) Monday. He was previously arrested last Wednesday for aggravated assault with a firearm and resisting an officer in regard to a property line dispute with a neighbor.

On Monday, Lincoln Parish deputies were called by the neighbor who said Schmitt had been yelling at them from his property in violation of a supplemental order of bail.

Deputies talked with Schmitt who he was telling his neighbor to keep the plants he was planting on his side of the property line. Schmitt said the order pertained to the wife and not to the husband he was talking to.

Deputies later verified the order pertained to anyone connected with the complainant. Schmitt was so informed and arrested for violation of a protective order.

As of Tuesday evening, he remained at the Lincoln Parish Detention Center with no bail set.

This information has been provided by a law enforcement agency as public information. Persons named or shown in photographs or video as suspects in a criminal investigation, or arrested and charged with a crime, have not been convicted of any criminal offense and are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.


LA Tech’s Wood appointed to DI Council

Courtesy of LA Tech Athletic Communications

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has appointed Louisiana Tech VP and Director of Athletics Eric Wood to its Division I Council. Wood’s four-year appointment is effective starting July 1.

The Division I Council is a high-level group responsible for the day-to-day decision-making for Division I.
“Even before Eric joined our Tech Family, we saw he would be a strong leader for our Athletics Department and in our University,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice.

“His work helps support Louisiana Tech’s overall mission while working to help our student-athletes compete on the greatest level possible. Eric’s representation of both Louisiana Tech and Conference USA on this council will allow him to share the vision we have for LA Tech Athletics with the country.”

Wood was announced as LA Tech’s VP and AD in October of 2020. He came to Ruston following a five-year stint at UCF where he spent the four of those years as the Deputy AD for Competitive Excellence. Wood has also served in various administrative capacities at Arkansas, Wake Forest, Clemson, and the University of New Haven while also working at the Atlantic Coast Conference office.

He is a member of the Board of Trustees at his alma mater of Sacred Heart University.

During the first year in his new role, Wood quickly made a name for himself within the LA Tech Family as well as Conference USA, as illustrated by his appointment as Chair of the Football Success Committee and the league representative to the NCAA Division I Football Oversight Committee.

Wood is the first African-American Vice President and the first minority Director of Athletics in the University’s history. He is also the first Director of Athletics in LA Tech history to also serve as a Vice President.

“I look forward to representing Conference USA and Louisiana Tech on the Division I Council during a pivotal time in the history of collegiate athletics,” said Wood. “With the ever-changing landscape of our profession, I think it’s important to have a voice on so many important topics that will mold the future of college athletics.”

Since his arrival in Ruston, the Louisiana Tech student athletes have been successful on the competitive playing fields as well as in the classroom. An illustration of this success was the recent announcement that a record number of Tech student athletes earned a spot on the C-USA Commissioners Honor Roll and were named C-USA Academic Medalists.

On the playing fields, Louisiana Tech teams have had success, including C-USA West Division titles by men’s basketball (2021), baseball (2021) and women’s basketball (2022) and two NCAA Tournament appearances by the Lady Techster bowling team (2021, 2022). The 2021 Bulldog baseball team hosted the school’s first ever NCAA Baseball Regional while men’s and women’s basketball both made postseason appearances.

On the fundraising front, the University saw a 60 percent growth in total gifts from the previous year ($5.1M to $8.1M) and a 23 percent growth in total donors. The Louisiana Tech Athletic Club (LTAC) saw a 19 percent growth in total donors, including a 100 percent participation by full-time athletic department employees (the first time ever on record).


Rock throwing leads to arrest

On Monday, deputies of the Lincoln Parish Sheriff’s Department were dispatched to a Tarbutton Road residence regarding a disturbance. The caller, who identified herself as Loretta Gonzalez, said she had been battered by Israel Álvarez. 

Álvarez told deputies he had not been in contact with Gonzalez and that she was the person who had been damaging his property in an apparent ongoing dispute. 

Deputies had been sent to the location three times over the weekend regarding property damage. On April 22, Alverez called the sheriff’s office to report a rock been thrown through his living room window. He identified the suspect as Ana Gonzalez.

On April 23, Alverez reported Gonzalez came to his residence and threatened his wife and children. On April 25, Alverez called again to report Gonzalez was back at his residence attempting to pull the back door open.

The person who identified herself as Lorretta Gonzalez was found to be the Ana Gonzalez in question. Based on evidence at the same and statements from witnesses, Gonzalez was arrested for two counts of simple criminal damage to property and resisting an officer by providing false information. 

Gonzalez was booked at the Lincoln Parish detention Center and bail was set at $5,500.

This information has been provided by a law enforcement agency as public information. Persons named or shown in photographs or video as suspects in a criminal investigation, or arrested and charged with a crime, have not been convicted of any criminal offense and are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.


Bearcats ride big moments to win in playoff opener

By T. Scott Boatrght 

Baseball is often a game of timing — a game of moments.

And the Ruston High School baseball team ended up with more of those big moments at the right times Tuesday night.

After surrendering an early one-run to 23rd-seeded Mandeville at the Ruston Sports Complex, the 10th-seeded Bearcats saved their best for last to take a 2-1 win in opening-round play of the Class 5A playoffs.

“We’re going to take things one pitch at a time,” said first-year Bearcats coach Zack Smith. “That’s what we preach every day – win each game, win each moment. There’s a lot of moments in every game and we just try to win every one of them.”

It was the Skippers who turned in the first big moment as Wes Carr led off with a single, reached second on a field error before scoring on an RBI single hit by rightfield Rex Henderson.

That would be the last run given up by Bearcats pitcher Reid Williams, who completed the seven-inning game with eight strikeouts with only two walks and four total hits for the Skippers. 

“It was a fun game to play and be part of,” Williams said. “A great game and a great win. I trusted my defense and grinded it out.”

Smith was proud of the way his pitcher performed in a pressure situation.

“It was a great performance,” Smith said of his senior pitcher. “Reid hadn’t had any pitching experience on the mound before this year. And then to pitch like that in this atmosphere, to see him do that – it was a great performance.”

Mandeville pitcher Remy Marsh turned in a strong game himself,  also giving up only four hits to the Bearcats while allowing four walks and fanning seven batters.

Ruston turned in its first big moment in the bottom of the fourth inning. Dawson Szymanski singled with one out before being plated on a double hit by Cade Patterson to tie things up at 1-1.

The Bearcats’ next big moment came with one out in the bottom of the sixth inning. Szymanski singled to reach base this time before advancing to second on a wild pitch.

Marsh then forced a flyout before left fielder Dyson Fields stepped to the plate and slapped a single to score Szymanski.

Ruston managed to load the bases on two straight walks before Marsh worked himself out of that jam to push the game to the top of the seventh inning.

“I was just thinking what Coach Smith had told me — stay to the middle,” Fields said. “When you stay to the middle, good things happen.

“It’s always a big win in the playoffs. It’s lose or go home. So you want to beat every team every time in the playoffs.”

Smith knew how timely Fields’ hit was.

“You saw the energy in the dugout when that happened,” Smith said. “It kind of settled everybody down. We were on pins and needles there for a little while in a close game, We felt we could breathe a little bit once we got that run.”

Williams had his own big moment in Mandeville’s last at-bat as he struck out the leadoff batter and then walked the next. But that baserunner was caught trying to swipe second base and was thrown out. Williams then chalked up his final strikeout of the contest to initiate the Bearcats’ victory celebration.

“It’s huge. We needed that,” Williams said of the win. “There’s some stuff we need to go back and work on in practice and then just get back at it and keep this thing rolling.”

Williams finished with one of Ruston hits while Fields was waiting in the wings to take the mound for the Bearcats should that have been needed.

“We love to have dual guys that can hit and pitch,” Smith said. “Dyson was going to come in to pitch if we got into trouble there, so he’s one of those dual guys, too.

Next up for the Bearcats (24-10) will be a best-of-three series at seven-seeded Sam Houston. That series is expected to begin Friday evening with games two and three (if needed) being played on Saturday.

Sam Houston edged 26th-seeded Lafayette 4-3 on Tuesday night.


Teacher Feature: CHS’s Aimee Rambin pushes students to succeed 

By Madison Remrey

Aimee Rambin, a teacher from Choudrant High School, invests in her students and provides them with a positive and welcoming learning environment while teaching them life skills.

Rambin is a family and consumer sciences teacher at Choudrant High School. In this position, she teaches students a range of skills that are needed in the adult world — folding laundry, cooking, cleaning and more. 

She did not begin her career with teaching high school. At first, Rambin worked with kids in foster care and group homes, teaching them life skills. After that, she worked with adults. This is when she realized she had a passion for working with teenagers.

Rambin said she enjoys teaching and being able to help kids reach their full potential. 

Students of Rambin’s said that she has left a lasting impact on them and her willingness to help them succeed is one reason why.

Kendall Maddox, one of Rambin’s former students, said that Rambin has left a lasting impact on her and Rambin’s willingness to help them succeed is one reason why.

“She always made class fun and treated us as if we were her own kids and not just students,” Maddox said. “She would even help us with assignments for other classes because she just wanted us to succeed. She provided a very warm and welcoming learning environment. She truly cares for her students.”

Along with the positives of teaching, though, Rambin said there also comes challenging days.

The administration, mixed with her faith, is what keeps Rambin going on the hard days.

“We have a super supportive administration at Choudrant,” Rambin said. “Our principal is super supportive. Our counselors are super supportive. I feel like we work in a very supportive environment where you can go talk to somebody anytime there’s a challenge.”

At the end of the day, Rambin said that if there is one thing she could tell all of her students —- past, present and future —- it would be to never give up.

“Never give up,” Rambin said. “Never give up on your dreams. Never give up on yourself. Don’t quit. Even if you’re having a bad day, there’s always a better day.”


 An A+ for Dr. B, Tech’s original Smooth Operator

His mind is cracker-jack sharp but the frame of our favorite orthopedic surgeon is failing him now, a casualty of hard work and 80-plus years, roughly a half century of that used to heal the wear and tear on his patients, including thousands of student athletes at Louisiana Tech when he was its team doctor from 1973-2013.

The University’s most recent recognition of Dr. Billy Bundrick was Saturday when a life-sized statue of “Dr. B” was unveiled and dedicated by the softball field named in his honor — Dr. Billy Bundrick Field.

The players affectionately call the field “The Billy,” a playful nickname its honoree heartedly approves of since Dr. B has always been about competition and winning and spreading the joy.

The University could dedicate 10 statues and probably still fall short of recognizing all Dr. B has done for the school. A three-time football letter winner and the team’s captain in 1959, Dr. B made a career of taking one for the team. Dr. B, his remarkable and imminently likeable assistant Spanky McCoy, and longtime Tech athletic trainer Sam Wilkinson formed a mortal but formidable holy trinity to combat frayed nerves, hurt feelings, busted ligaments, and broken bones for three decades.

“It’s unbelievable how good Dr. Bundrick was to Louisiana Tech and how much he’s meant to us,” Wilkinson said.

Former athletic director Jim Oakes, who, as Tech’s lead football manager in the mid-’70s had a front row seat to Dr. Bundrick’s influence, called his friend “the greatest sports medicine doctor to ever serve a university athletic program.”

Dr. B is a Tech Athletics Hall of Famer, a former Alumnus of the Year, and everything in between.

“The numerous honors he’s earned only scratch the surface of his significance to us,” University President Dr. Les Guice said. “His greatest contribution has been in the service of others.”

He did it one knee and one back and one foot at the time, each stitch a soft-spoken encouragement.

Dr. B’s biggest fan, physically and figuratively, is likely Karl Malone, the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer; his family’s donation made the statue a reality. Bundrick has been an advisor to Malone, a quiet encourager and his most trusted confidant, since before Malone was the famous “Mailman.” In the flamboyant NBA, Karl always had a posse of one: Dr. B.

If that’s hard to understand, or if you’ve never seen a 6-foot-9 teardrop, you could have seen one Saturday as Malone’s emotion for his friend was evident.

“You,” Malone said to a smiling Dr. B, “are my hero.” He spoke for many in the crowd.

Walking to the soccer pitch next door or to The Billy, Tech’s student athletes would be wise to consider the statue and copy what it represents, a monument to caring and leaving it all on the field, the definition in bronze of a selfless and smooth operator.

Contact Teddy at teddy@latech.edu


Migration allows for birdwatching activities

By Julia Griffin

The number of total birders in the United States continues to rise every year, and approximately 12.34 million people actively participate in this popular pastime. Spring migration started in February, and many different birds find their way into residents’ backyards as the weather warms up.

Author and wildlife biologist David Moreland talked about some of the birds he sees in his backyard and how to attract birds.

Moreland, an East Feliciana Parish resident, said some of the birds that have started to arrive in his backyard are bright red summer tanagers, vibrant orchard orioles and brown-headed cowbirds. These birds are also discoverable around Lincoln Parish.

“The common resident birds like cardinals, blue jays, chickadees and titmice never left,” he said. “Some purple martens arrived the first week of March, and we have three nesting pairs.”

Birds like cardinals and chickadees are around throughout the year.

“Different species of birds are attracted to different landscapes primarily based on their feeding needs. Some birds eat seeds and fruits, and some eat insects,” Moreland said. “Backyard bird feeders are a great way to attract the seed-eating birds.”

Moreland said some seed-eating birds are indigo buntings, blue grosbeaks and rose-breasted grosbeaks.

Louisiana is also home to many different public lands available for bird watching like, wildlife management areas, federal refuges, national forest land and state parks.

James Lake Birding Trail in Dubach is one place in Louisiana to see a wide variety of birds. Bird lovers can view these magnificent creatures from three locations — the viewing platform, the bridge or the walking trail. 

“Many parks have nature trails and areas designed for viewing birds like the Sherburne Wildlife Management Area’s South Farm,” Moreland said, which has a special day for looking at the wood stork.

A free Backyard Birding workshop will be offered May 3 at the Lincoln Parish Library. Moreland will share more information on how to attract bluebirds, purple martins and hummingbirds, migration patterns, feeders and more. 

To register to attend, participants should call or text (318) 237-8350 and provide his or her contact information and the name of the workshop he or she would like to attend. 

For more information visit the Local Bird Organizations Associated with the Audubon Society or the Bayou State Blue Bird Association.


Argent awarded state Growth Leader Legend

Ruston’s Argent Financial Group was presented with the inaugural Growth Leader Legend award by Louisiana Economic Development at the 2022 Spotlight Louisiana event.

Ten companies were selected as the 2022 Louisiana Growth Leaders by a statewide panel of economic development professionals, considering the company’s growth, strategy, innovation, philanthropy and leadership. Within the Louisiana Growth Leaders, the Growth Leader Legend award is regarded as the highest honor. This award celebrates past leaders who have exemplified continued success. Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards was present at the Spotlight Louisiana event to offer his congratulations.

“From manufacturing to financial services, each of our 2022 Louisiana Growth Leaders and the inaugural Legend awardee have succeeded in bringing great products and services to the marketplace,” Edwards said. “The companies being recognized have persevered through challenges, capitalized on opportunities, and represent some of the best of what Louisiana has to offer. I look forward to their continued success.”

Argent was honored with the Growth Leader Legend award for its vision, execution and results, particularly in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well at its commitment to philanthropy.

“An early investor in Argent once encouraged us, ‘There may be a limit of what we can do in Ruston, but there is no limit to what we can do from Ruston,’” Argent Founder and CEO Kyle McDonald said. “Thirty-two years later, Argent is still headquartered in Ruston and boasts over 310 employees in 30 markets across 12 states, managing more than $39 billion of our clients’ assets. We are proud of our history and growth, and we are humbled to be the inaugural recipient of the Louisiana Growth Leader Legend award.”


Sequence of Returns

If you were going to hire a guide to scale a particularly high summit what would be your number one goal?  Reaching the apex?  What about a safe a secure descent?  Real life shows us that most climbers are injured coming down the mountain.  Either from lack of food and water or injury.

Financial and retirement planning is much the same.  We tend to spend significant time planning and saving without really thinking of the best method to “take” these funds.   While working and saving we have co-workers, friends, and financial professionals to assist with decision making.  Without sound advice and planning location and timing of pulling funds can have a direct impact on deteriorating the amount of Social Security taxation and cost of Medicare Part B premiums. 

Have you heard the term “sequence of returns”?  If not let’s set up a time to review and discuss your exposure to this pitfall.  Having retirement dollars exposed to market risk while pulling income could be a very costly mistake in later years.  Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) are especially risky since the individual has little discretion in taking these funds. These issues and others could significantly reduce the longevity of your funds.  Thereby causing you harm as you descend the retirement mountain.  Let’s visit about trip planning!

Contact Reinette today!

318-481-6539

Notice of death — April 26, 2022

Gladys Joye Fellows 
December 18, 1938 – April 25, 2022 
Visitation: 12:45-2 p.m. Friday, April 29 at Mt. Ararat Baptist Church, 792 LA-552, Downsville 
Funeral service: 2 p.m. Friday, April 29 at Mt. Ararat Baptist Church, 792 LA-552, Downsville 
Cemetery committal: Friday, April 29 at Mt. Ararat Cemetery, Hwy 552, Downsville  

Sidney Joel Colvin Sr. 
May 8, 1961 – April 25, 2022 
Visitation: Kilpatrick Funeral Homes – Ruston, Wednesday, April 27, 2022, 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm 
Service: Kilpatrick Funeral Homes – Ruston, Thursday, April 28, 2022, 10:00 am 
Cemetery: Greenwood Cemetery, Thursday, April 28, 2022 


LPJ hosts art/photo contest

Group of peaches with half and green leaves isolated on white background with clipping path

By Judith Roberts, publisher

The Lincoln Parish Journal is holding a contest for our readers (must be an email subscriber, which is FREE to do) to submit photos or artwork that depict Lincoln Parish.

The winning selection will be incorporated into a new, fresh LPJ masthead (replacing the old timing typewriter keyboard image).

The only criteria for contestants are:

  • own the rights to the photo or artwork
  • be an LPJ email subscriber
  • simplistic, classy imagery that depicts Lincoln Parish
  • and the contestant must like FREE stuff

The contest will run through Friday, May 13 at which time our LPJ staff will select a winner. That winner will receive a free LPJ gift pack with gift cards and merchandise from a number of our advertisers.

In order to become an email subscriber to the LPJ and get the latest Lincoln Parish news straight to your email every morning at 6:55 a.m., simply click HERE. It’s free today and always will be free


Prep baseball playoffs begin today for area teams

By T. Scott Boatright

Four Lincoln Parish prep baseball teams have received their postseason marching orders with playoff first pitches set to take place starting today.

Ruston High School is the 10th seed in Class 5A and will open the playoffs at 6 p.m. today as the Bearcats play host to 23rd-seeded Mandeville.

The Bearcats stand at 23-10 and will enter the game on a roll with a seven-game winning streak. Ruston has also won 10 of its last 11 games, outscoring those opponents 112-32.

Mandeville heads into the postseason at 16-18.

Tickets for Ruston’s playoff opener will cost $10 each. 

Defending Class B state champion Choudrant is the highest seeded playoff team at No. 2.

The Aggies received an opening-round bye and will play their first postseason contest in round two against the winner of a first-round showdown sending 18th-seeded Marepaus to 15th-seeded Saline.

Choudrant stands at 25-7 on the season and has won nine straight games and 11 of its last 13 contests.

Simsboro will also open the Class B playoffs at home as the 14th-seeded Tigers play host to 19th-seed Florien at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday.

The Tigers stand at 14-13 on the season while the Black Cats will enter the game at 7-22.

Lincoln Preparatory School is the 25th-seeded team in Class 1-A and will play at eighth-seeded Delta Charter at 6 p.m. on Wednesday.


Man arrested for domestic abuse

A Ruston man was arrested Sunday on several domestic violence charges.

Ruston Police responded to an East California Avenue address regarding a man assaulting his wife. The officer’s report noted the victim said her husband strangled her until she almost lost consciousness. She also said her husband pulled her hair. Officers saw redness around the victim’s neck. The suspect had already left the scene before officers arrived.

At about 9:45 Sunday morning, officers received a second call to the residence reporting the husband had returned. Responding officers took him into custody and reinterviewed the victim. She said domestic violence had been an issue for two years and that he had threatened to kill her. When she attempted to run out of the house to get help, he pulled in back inside by the hair. The victim said this occurred in front of their children who were in the room.

Michael S. Cherry, 36, was booked at the Lincoln Parish Detention Center for domestic abuse battery by strangulation, false imprisonment, and domestic abuse child endangerment. 

Cherry’s bail had not been set by Monday afternoon.

This information has been provided by a law enforcement agency as public information. Persons named or shown in photographs or video as suspects in a criminal investigation, or arrested and charged with a crime, have not been convicted of any criminal offense and are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.


Simsboro basketball trio signs NLI


By T. Scott Boatright

It’s almost become a rite of spring for Simsboro High School basketball — having Tigers sign to continue their hoops careers on the collegiate level.

With Jordan Crawford, Nick Maryland and Lee Abney inking official scholarships Friday at the SHS Gym to continue their hoops dreams in college, Simsboro now has nine players to do so over the past seven years.

And that’s something SHS coach Josh Brown, who will depart the school at the end of the academic year to take on the same at Claiborne Christian School in West Monroe, where his wife teaches and children attend, finds much pride in.

“That’s a testament to how hard these kids work,” Brown said. “To be a Class B school to have nine basketball players sign to continue their basketball careers on the college level is really remarkable and something I’m proud of and know they’re proud of, too..

“Especially in today’s world, with the transfer portal and extra seasons granted because of COVID, there really aren’t a lot of opportunities out there for high school kids right now and the Division I and Division II level. I tell our guys the most important thing is to find somebody who wants you and somewhere you can play, and you can get a free education out of it.”

Crawford, Maryland and Abney have also been part of four Class B championship teams over the past five seasons.

Crawford will take his skills to Dawson Community College in Glendive, Montana, after being named 2022 Class B Tournament Championship Game MVP and averaging 15.5 points, 7.6 rebounds and five assists per game while shooting 53% from the field and 32% from 3-point range.

“The coach (Joe Peterson) and the players reached out and made it feel like it was going to be a home for me,” Crawford said. “I got to talk to a lot of the teachers there and all the people just seemed real nice, even before they knew I was going to sign there. And that made it feel like the right place for me.”

“It’s been an amazing experience playing basketball here at Simsboro. I think I’ve learned a lot here that will make me a better person and a better player on the next level.”

Peterson said he was pleased to add a player of Jordan’s caliber to his squad.

“I am absolutely elated to sign Jordan,” Peterson said. “He has the talent, skills and character to be an outstanding college basketball player.  I have no idea how so many other coaches overlooked him, but I have absolutely no doubt in his ability. He is going to shine here and will prove a lot of people wrong. Jordan Crawford is a winner on and off the court.”

Simsboro forward Nick Maryland, like Crawford a Class B First Team All State selection, is taking his basketball prowess to Redlands Community College in El Reno, Oklahoma after averaging 16.0 points per game for the Tigers as a senior.

“Out of all the coaches who looked at me, the Redlands staff were the ones that felt like they were the most interested in me,” Maryland said. “And I’m not only talking about basketball. It felt like they really cared about me outside of basketball, and that’s really the season I chose them.

“I’m going to take everything my coaches here have taught me since the eighth grade. I’ve been blessed to have Coach Brown and his coaching staff teaching and guiding me and I want to keep on making them proud.”

The 6-5 Abney, who as a senior averaged a double-double with 10 points and 10 rebounds along with three assists per game, is headed to Northland Community College in Minnesota.

“I just want to further my education and my career in basketball,” Abney said. “I feel like Northland can really help me develop my game both on defense and offense. They seem to take an interest in their players both as students and as players, and I like that.”

Abney said that while he’s still unsure of what academic direction he’ll head in, nursing is a field he’s considering.

“There’s not a lot of male nurses out there and I hear there’s a lot of jobs available because of that,” Abney said. “I love to help people, and there’s good money in doing it, so that’s something I’m thinking about.”

Abney said what he’ll bring to Northland is all about attitude.

“Northland is going to get an aggressive, hard-working  forward that has a no-quit attitude,” Abney said.